This essay questions the possibility (and impossibility) of the equation: citizenship = nationality. Can the right to citizenship be thought as still based on traditional criteria of belonging to the nation-state? From the reflections of Hannah Arendt on the "Decline of the Nation-state" and the "End of the Rights of Man" (The Origins of Totalitarianism, 1951), to the radical critique of the "immigration policies" implemented in recent years in Europe and Italy (main theoretical reference to Étienne Balibar), a détour to ancient Greece reflects on Plato's "bad divisions"(inside/outside, inclusion/exclusion, citizen/foreigner) that still inform our way to set up and solve problems.

Cittadinanza =nazionalità. Un'equazione ancora sostenibile?

CACCIATORE, FORTUNATO
2010

Abstract

This essay questions the possibility (and impossibility) of the equation: citizenship = nationality. Can the right to citizenship be thought as still based on traditional criteria of belonging to the nation-state? From the reflections of Hannah Arendt on the "Decline of the Nation-state" and the "End of the Rights of Man" (The Origins of Totalitarianism, 1951), to the radical critique of the "immigration policies" implemented in recent years in Europe and Italy (main theoretical reference to Étienne Balibar), a détour to ancient Greece reflects on Plato's "bad divisions"(inside/outside, inclusion/exclusion, citizen/foreigner) that still inform our way to set up and solve problems.
978-88-5750-247-2
storia; migrazioni; costituzione
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/150176
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