The United States Community Shear-Wave Velocity (VS) Profile Database (PDB) is a major multi-institutional effort that has developed an open-access VS profile database for sites in the United States. Data was collected for this project from a wide variety of sources, ranging from federal government reports, California and other state agencies, university research reports, reports from private industry, and utility companies. All data are within the public domain, but much of it was for practical purposes inaccessible to most potential users. Data collection primarily began in California, where over 2300 profiles exist, and to a limited extent has expanded to encompass selected studies in other portions of the U.S. VS profiles obtained from a wide array of geophysical techniques are included in this database, along with additional supplemental geotechnical data and metadata pertaining to the site measurement location, including P-wave velocities, geotechnical logs, and penetration test data. Due to the diverse nature of data types encountered during data collection, a project-specific and extensible relational database schema of sufficient breadth was developed, and novel data organization protocols were utilized to handle and store different data formats. A web interface (www.uclageo.com/VPDB) was developed for data query, visualization, and download. Recent updates to the schema include modification of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) tables to accommodate a recent influx of this important data type. Additional routines have been developed to derive parameters from the data that are implemented in Python on a Jupyter Notebook enabled by the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) DesignSafe-Cyber Infrastructure. These efforts were guided by two community workshops during project planning and integration of input from a national and global research community, building off of past work by the U.S. Geological Survey, California state agencies, and the Consortium of Organizations for Strong Motion Observation Systems (COSMOS). This resource is anticipated to be useful to geotechnical engineers and engineering seismologists for diverse applications.

Status of the United States community shear-wave velocity profile database

Zimmaro P.;
2021

Abstract

The United States Community Shear-Wave Velocity (VS) Profile Database (PDB) is a major multi-institutional effort that has developed an open-access VS profile database for sites in the United States. Data was collected for this project from a wide variety of sources, ranging from federal government reports, California and other state agencies, university research reports, reports from private industry, and utility companies. All data are within the public domain, but much of it was for practical purposes inaccessible to most potential users. Data collection primarily began in California, where over 2300 profiles exist, and to a limited extent has expanded to encompass selected studies in other portions of the U.S. VS profiles obtained from a wide array of geophysical techniques are included in this database, along with additional supplemental geotechnical data and metadata pertaining to the site measurement location, including P-wave velocities, geotechnical logs, and penetration test data. Due to the diverse nature of data types encountered during data collection, a project-specific and extensible relational database schema of sufficient breadth was developed, and novel data organization protocols were utilized to handle and store different data formats. A web interface (www.uclageo.com/VPDB) was developed for data query, visualization, and download. Recent updates to the schema include modification of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) tables to accommodate a recent influx of this important data type. Additional routines have been developed to derive parameters from the data that are implemented in Python on a Jupyter Notebook enabled by the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) DesignSafe-Cyber Infrastructure. These efforts were guided by two community workshops during project planning and integration of input from a national and global research community, building off of past work by the U.S. Geological Survey, California state agencies, and the Consortium of Organizations for Strong Motion Observation Systems (COSMOS). This resource is anticipated to be useful to geotechnical engineers and engineering seismologists for diverse applications.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/335487
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact