It is already widely known that the different brain areas involved in blood pressure control, are highly vulnerable to the deleterious effects of this condition. Of particular concern are hypertensive and neuroinflammatory-dependent injuries that by modifying blood flow account for artery structural and functional alterations. It was thus our intention to establish if expression changes of some key brain neuroinflammatory factors like caspase-1,3, NF-kB, IL-1β and NLRP3, which are known to control blood pressure, are actively involved with inflammation regulatory events in a highly valuable spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. Indeed, notably increased (p < 0.001) caspase-1, NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA levels were detected in amygdalar plus hypothalamic areas of SHR. Contextually, similar up-regulated levels of these factors were also reported in brainstem nuclei with respect to the few hippocampal areas. This trend was supported by moderate increases (p < 0.05) of NLRP3 in amygdalar and brainstem sites, while notably greater expression differences of NF-kB protein were observed in hippocampal and hypothalamic areas of SHR. At the same time, moderately increased levels of iNOS were typical of all of the above brain areas with the exception of the consistently (p < 0.01) increased levels featured in the brainstem. Moreover, even immunohistochemical evaluations supplied notably and moderately increased cleaved caspase-3 cell levels in hippocampus and hypothalamus areas, respectively. Overall, evident hypertensive bouts correlated to neuroinflammatory events, especially in brain areas controlling blood pressure, tend to underlie the value of novel therapeutic approaches designed to improve brain blood flow and subsequently reduce hypertensive-dependent cerebral complications.

Role of Brain Neuroinflammatory Factors on Hypertension in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

Pasqua, Teresa;Alò, Raffaella;Cerra, Maria Carmela;Angelone, Tommaso;Canonaco, Marcello
2018-01-01

Abstract

It is already widely known that the different brain areas involved in blood pressure control, are highly vulnerable to the deleterious effects of this condition. Of particular concern are hypertensive and neuroinflammatory-dependent injuries that by modifying blood flow account for artery structural and functional alterations. It was thus our intention to establish if expression changes of some key brain neuroinflammatory factors like caspase-1,3, NF-kB, IL-1β and NLRP3, which are known to control blood pressure, are actively involved with inflammation regulatory events in a highly valuable spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. Indeed, notably increased (p < 0.001) caspase-1, NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA levels were detected in amygdalar plus hypothalamic areas of SHR. Contextually, similar up-regulated levels of these factors were also reported in brainstem nuclei with respect to the few hippocampal areas. This trend was supported by moderate increases (p < 0.05) of NLRP3 in amygdalar and brainstem sites, while notably greater expression differences of NF-kB protein were observed in hippocampal and hypothalamic areas of SHR. At the same time, moderately increased levels of iNOS were typical of all of the above brain areas with the exception of the consistently (p < 0.01) increased levels featured in the brainstem. Moreover, even immunohistochemical evaluations supplied notably and moderately increased cleaved caspase-3 cell levels in hippocampus and hypothalamus areas, respectively. Overall, evident hypertensive bouts correlated to neuroinflammatory events, especially in brain areas controlling blood pressure, tend to underlie the value of novel therapeutic approaches designed to improve brain blood flow and subsequently reduce hypertensive-dependent cerebral complications.
NLRP3; hypertension; intracellular pathways; neuroinflammation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/271656
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