The growing application of composite materials in aerospace leads to the urgent need of non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) techniques capable of detecting defects such as impact damage and delamination possibly existing in those materials. Eddy current pulsed thermography is an emerging non-destructive testing (NDT) technique capable of detecting such defects. However, characterization of delamination within composite materials is difficult to be achieved by a single pulse excitation, especially in carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials as the extraction of thermal diffusion in such multi-layered structures is challenging. To cope with this problem of signal-to-noise ratio, this paper proposes the eddy current pulse-compression thermography (ECPuCT), combining the Barker code modulated eddy current excitation and pulse-compression technique to enhance the capability of characterizing delamination on carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials. Additionally, a thermal pattern enhanced method based on kernel principal component analysis technique is used to locate the delaminated areas. Two features, including a newly proposed crossing point of impulse responses related to defective and non-defective areas and skewness of impulse responses are investigated for delamination depth evaluation. Results show that delamination can be detected within depths ranging from 0.46 mm to 2.30 mm and both the proposed features have a monotonic relationship with delamination depths.

New features for delamination depth evaluation in carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials using eddy current pulse-compression thermography

Laureti, S.;Ricci, M.
2019

Abstract

The growing application of composite materials in aerospace leads to the urgent need of non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) techniques capable of detecting defects such as impact damage and delamination possibly existing in those materials. Eddy current pulsed thermography is an emerging non-destructive testing (NDT) technique capable of detecting such defects. However, characterization of delamination within composite materials is difficult to be achieved by a single pulse excitation, especially in carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials as the extraction of thermal diffusion in such multi-layered structures is challenging. To cope with this problem of signal-to-noise ratio, this paper proposes the eddy current pulse-compression thermography (ECPuCT), combining the Barker code modulated eddy current excitation and pulse-compression technique to enhance the capability of characterizing delamination on carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials. Additionally, a thermal pattern enhanced method based on kernel principal component analysis technique is used to locate the delaminated areas. Two features, including a newly proposed crossing point of impulse responses related to defective and non-defective areas and skewness of impulse responses are investigated for delamination depth evaluation. Results show that delamination can be detected within depths ranging from 0.46 mm to 2.30 mm and both the proposed features have a monotonic relationship with delamination depths.
Barker code; Carbon fiber reinforced plastic; Delamination depth; Eddy current pulsed thermography; Feature extraction; Pulse-compression; Materials Science (all); Condensed Matter Physics; Mechanical Engineering
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/290198
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