Ernst Bernhard, the initiator of Jungian psychotherapy in Italy, from the summer of 1944 worked continuously in Rome, becoming, for many important intellectuals, a spiritual guide and a charismatic figure. The internment in southern Italy of Bernhard, during the Second World War, is a historical fact known for some time: he himself talks about it in Mitobiografia (1969), the volume edited by his pupil Hélène Erba-Tissot. Little known, however, are the actual consistency of that internment and the dynamics of the rapid return to Rome of Bernhard, just ten months after the arrest. In particular, little known is the fact that he was not only restrict in a concentration camp (as he himself had suggested), but also in an isolated village; and the fact that his liberation, favored by the Orientalist Giuseppe Tucci, did not correspond, properly, to the "rescue" of a Jew threatened with deportation to the Lager, which has been written so far, with emphasis, on several occasions. This essay now aims to clarify these issues. And, for this purpose, it relies, above all, on the correspondence between Bernhard and his companion Dora Friedländer during the months of internment (published in 2011) and the unpublished documentation found by the Author at the Archivio Centrale dello Stato in Rome.

Dieci lunghi mesi al Sud. L'internamento in Italia e il "salvataggio" di Ernst Bernhard

Capogreco Carlo S
2019

Abstract

Ernst Bernhard, the initiator of Jungian psychotherapy in Italy, from the summer of 1944 worked continuously in Rome, becoming, for many important intellectuals, a spiritual guide and a charismatic figure. The internment in southern Italy of Bernhard, during the Second World War, is a historical fact known for some time: he himself talks about it in Mitobiografia (1969), the volume edited by his pupil Hélène Erba-Tissot. Little known, however, are the actual consistency of that internment and the dynamics of the rapid return to Rome of Bernhard, just ten months after the arrest. In particular, little known is the fact that he was not only restrict in a concentration camp (as he himself had suggested), but also in an isolated village; and the fact that his liberation, favored by the Orientalist Giuseppe Tucci, did not correspond, properly, to the "rescue" of a Jew threatened with deportation to the Lager, which has been written so far, with emphasis, on several occasions. This essay now aims to clarify these issues. And, for this purpose, it relies, above all, on the correspondence between Bernhard and his companion Dora Friedländer during the months of internment (published in 2011) and the unpublished documentation found by the Author at the Archivio Centrale dello Stato in Rome.
Civilian Internment, World War Two, Antisemitism in Fascist Italy
Internamento civile, Seconda guerra mondiali, Antisemitismo nell'Italia fascista
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/297265
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