At present, concerns are pointing to “tasteful” high-fat diets as a cause of conditioning physical-social states that through alterations of some key emotional- and nutritional-related limbic circuits such as hypothalamic and amygdalar areas lead to obesity states. Feeding and energetic homeostatic molecular mechanisms are part of a complex neuronal circuit accounting for this metabolic disorder. In an attempt to exclude conventional drugs for treating obesity, daidzein, a natural glycosidic isoflavone, which mimics estrogenic neuroprotective properties against increased body weight, is beginning to be preferred. In this study, evident anxiolytic-like behaviors were detected following treatment of high-fat diet hamsters with daidzein as shown by extremely evident (p < 0.001) exploration tendencies in novel object recognition test and a notably greater amount of time spent (p < 0.01) in open arms of elevated plus maze. Moreover, the isoflavone promoted a protective role against neurodegeneration processes as shown by few, if any, amino cupric silver granules in amygdalar, hypothalamic and hippocampal neuronal fields when compared with obese hamsters. Interestingly, elevated expression levels of the anorexic neuropeptide receptor neurotensin1 in the above limbic areas of obese hamsters were extremely reduced by daidzein, especially during recovery of cognitive events. Contextually, such effects were strongly paralleled by increased levels of the anti-neuroinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10. Our results corroborate a neuroprotective ability of this natural glycosidic isoflavone, which through its interaction with the receptor neurotensin1 and interleukin-10 pathways is correlated not only to improved feeding states, and subsequently obesity conditions, but above all to cognitive performances.

Daidzein Pro-cognitive Effects Coincided with Changes of Brain Neurotensin1 Receptor and Interleukin-10 Expression Levels in Obese Hamsters

Alò Raffaella;Bruno Rosalinda.;Canonaco Marcello
;
Facciolo Rosa Maria
2021

Abstract

At present, concerns are pointing to “tasteful” high-fat diets as a cause of conditioning physical-social states that through alterations of some key emotional- and nutritional-related limbic circuits such as hypothalamic and amygdalar areas lead to obesity states. Feeding and energetic homeostatic molecular mechanisms are part of a complex neuronal circuit accounting for this metabolic disorder. In an attempt to exclude conventional drugs for treating obesity, daidzein, a natural glycosidic isoflavone, which mimics estrogenic neuroprotective properties against increased body weight, is beginning to be preferred. In this study, evident anxiolytic-like behaviors were detected following treatment of high-fat diet hamsters with daidzein as shown by extremely evident (p < 0.001) exploration tendencies in novel object recognition test and a notably greater amount of time spent (p < 0.01) in open arms of elevated plus maze. Moreover, the isoflavone promoted a protective role against neurodegeneration processes as shown by few, if any, amino cupric silver granules in amygdalar, hypothalamic and hippocampal neuronal fields when compared with obese hamsters. Interestingly, elevated expression levels of the anorexic neuropeptide receptor neurotensin1 in the above limbic areas of obese hamsters were extremely reduced by daidzein, especially during recovery of cognitive events. Contextually, such effects were strongly paralleled by increased levels of the anti-neuroinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10. Our results corroborate a neuroprotective ability of this natural glycosidic isoflavone, which through its interaction with the receptor neurotensin1 and interleukin-10 pathways is correlated not only to improved feeding states, and subsequently obesity conditions, but above all to cognitive performances.
Anxiolytic
Interleukins
Mnemonic behaviors
Neurotensin receptor
Obesity
Phytoestrogen
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/313760
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