This work conveys the study of the production of synthetic fuels, in this case, methane and methanol, by means of comparing two processes that employ high-temperature water splitting based on solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) technology. In both cases, the process consists of mixing hydrogen produced by electrolysis with carbon dioxide in order to achieve hydrogenation synthesis via a catalytic reactor. An energy analysis was performed with special care on thermal integration (minimization of external heat requirements) via pinch analysis, as well as a final estimation of power-to-fuel overall efficiency. The study demonstrates that power-to-methane and power-to-methanol process can achieve efficiency of up to ≈77% and ≈59%, respectively. The energy analysis (based on the process modelling developed for both the systems) and the heat exchange network design enabled the development of capital expenditure estimation. An economic analysis comparison for the production cost of both synthetic fuels was performed with the purpose of highlighting any potential risk associated with the systems. The economic analysis considered the impact on synthetic fuel cost of some parameters as electrolysis specific costs, the expenditure for carbon dioxide, electricity price, and yearly operating hours. The results show that for both systems, as expected, the SOEC electrolyzer is the greatest capital expenditure of the design. Methanol synthesis plant showed lower efficiency and higher investment costs; on the other hand, fossil-based methanol has higher costs ($/MWh) than fossil methane; thus, the breakeven point of electricity price (i.e., that making economically comparable synthetic and fossil fuel) is similar for the two considered cases. It was concluded that to produce an economically attractive market for methane and methanol, the production plants should maintain a utilization factor of approximately 50%, the cost of SOECs should be near to 1050 €/kW and the electricity required to run the system needs to be supplied from renewable sources at a very low cost (below 40–50 $/MWh).

Power-to-fuels through carbon dioxide Re-Utilization and high-temperature electrolysis: A technical and economical comparison between synthetic methanol and methane

Giglio E.
;
2019

Abstract

This work conveys the study of the production of synthetic fuels, in this case, methane and methanol, by means of comparing two processes that employ high-temperature water splitting based on solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) technology. In both cases, the process consists of mixing hydrogen produced by electrolysis with carbon dioxide in order to achieve hydrogenation synthesis via a catalytic reactor. An energy analysis was performed with special care on thermal integration (minimization of external heat requirements) via pinch analysis, as well as a final estimation of power-to-fuel overall efficiency. The study demonstrates that power-to-methane and power-to-methanol process can achieve efficiency of up to ≈77% and ≈59%, respectively. The energy analysis (based on the process modelling developed for both the systems) and the heat exchange network design enabled the development of capital expenditure estimation. An economic analysis comparison for the production cost of both synthetic fuels was performed with the purpose of highlighting any potential risk associated with the systems. The economic analysis considered the impact on synthetic fuel cost of some parameters as electrolysis specific costs, the expenditure for carbon dioxide, electricity price, and yearly operating hours. The results show that for both systems, as expected, the SOEC electrolyzer is the greatest capital expenditure of the design. Methanol synthesis plant showed lower efficiency and higher investment costs; on the other hand, fossil-based methanol has higher costs ($/MWh) than fossil methane; thus, the breakeven point of electricity price (i.e., that making economically comparable synthetic and fossil fuel) is similar for the two considered cases. It was concluded that to produce an economically attractive market for methane and methanol, the production plants should maintain a utilization factor of approximately 50%, the cost of SOECs should be near to 1050 €/kW and the electricity required to run the system needs to be supplied from renewable sources at a very low cost (below 40–50 $/MWh).
Power-to-fuels
Solid oxide cells
Techno-economic analysis
Thermal integration
CO2 hydrogenation
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/318378
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 34
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact