In a number of applications, especially in pharmaceutical drug development, there is often a very small powder quantity available for evaluating the manufacturability of new drugs. However, it is highly desirable to be able to quickly evaluate processing issues, and where possible using the smallest powder quantity. In the present work, a proprietary commercial powder dispersion device (the disperser of Malvern© Morphologi G3) is adapted to evaluate the triboelectric charging tendency. A very small powder quantity (as small as 0.1 mg) is dispersed by a pressure pulse of compressed gas such as air or nitrogen. This causes the particles to become air borne and collide with the containing walls, resulting in dispersion and leading to triboelectric charge transfer between the particles and the walls. In this work, the charging propensity of a number of materials is evaluated and the effect of particle surface functional groups on the tribo-electric charge transfer is analysed. Model materials with a well-defined shape (glass ballotini) but with different silane groups deposited on their surfaces as well as a number of organic crystalline particles (such as aspirin, α-lactose monohydrate and paracetamol) are tested. Following dispersion the particles move immediately to a Faraday cup placed directly underneath the disperser. Therefore, particle charge is measured with no decay. The method can differentiate charging of different polymorphs of the same material, different silane groups on the surfaces of glass ballotini and different crystal morphologies obtained from crystallisation from various solvents.

Evaluation of a new dispersion technique for assessing triboelectric charging of powders

Alfano F.;Ghadiri M.
2018

Abstract

In a number of applications, especially in pharmaceutical drug development, there is often a very small powder quantity available for evaluating the manufacturability of new drugs. However, it is highly desirable to be able to quickly evaluate processing issues, and where possible using the smallest powder quantity. In the present work, a proprietary commercial powder dispersion device (the disperser of Malvern© Morphologi G3) is adapted to evaluate the triboelectric charging tendency. A very small powder quantity (as small as 0.1 mg) is dispersed by a pressure pulse of compressed gas such as air or nitrogen. This causes the particles to become air borne and collide with the containing walls, resulting in dispersion and leading to triboelectric charge transfer between the particles and the walls. In this work, the charging propensity of a number of materials is evaluated and the effect of particle surface functional groups on the tribo-electric charge transfer is analysed. Model materials with a well-defined shape (glass ballotini) but with different silane groups deposited on their surfaces as well as a number of organic crystalline particles (such as aspirin, α-lactose monohydrate and paracetamol) are tested. Following dispersion the particles move immediately to a Faraday cup placed directly underneath the disperser. Therefore, particle charge is measured with no decay. The method can differentiate charging of different polymorphs of the same material, different silane groups on the surfaces of glass ballotini and different crystal morphologies obtained from crystallisation from various solvents.
Malvern dispersion unit
Pharmaceutical powders
Surface properties
Triboelectric charging
Chemistry, Pharmaceutical
Crystallization
Particle Size
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Powders
Static Electricity
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/323116
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