Over the last two decades, radar-based contactless monitoring of vital signs (heartbeat and respiration rate) has raised increasing interest as an emerging and added value to health care. However, until now, the flaws caused by indoor multipath propagation formed a fundamental hurdle for the adoption of such technology in practical healthcare applications where reliability and robustness are crucial. Multipath reflections, originated from one person, combine with the direct signals and multipaths of other people and stationary objects, thus jeopardizing individual vital signs extraction and localization. This work focuses on tackling indoor multipath propagation.

Enabling Robust Radar-Based Localization and Vital Signs Monitoring in Multipath Propagation Environments

Mercuri, Marco
;
2021

Abstract

Over the last two decades, radar-based contactless monitoring of vital signs (heartbeat and respiration rate) has raised increasing interest as an emerging and added value to health care. However, until now, the flaws caused by indoor multipath propagation formed a fundamental hurdle for the adoption of such technology in practical healthcare applications where reliability and robustness are crucial. Multipath reflections, originated from one person, combine with the direct signals and multipaths of other people and stationary objects, thus jeopardizing individual vital signs extraction and localization. This work focuses on tackling indoor multipath propagation.
Algorithms
Heart Rate
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Rate
Monitoring, Physiologic
Radar
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Vital Signs
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/332936
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