Deep-marine clastic turbidite beds commonly occur in the Southern Apennines and record the main tectonic phases associated with the structural evolution of the area. Based on variations of detrital compositions through time, the sandstone suites are traditionally subdivided into four petrofacies: (I) quartzolithic (Burdigalian-Langhian), (II) quartzofeldspatholithic (Langhian-Tortonian), (III) quartzofeldspathic (Serravallian-Tortonian), and (IV) arkose (Tortonian-Messinian) sandstones. Since the complexity and diversity of these sandstone petrofacies, we aim to investigate their major diagenetic events and relate them with their detrital modes and physical properties in order to obtain key basic information at a regional scale, to better understand the main controls on petrophysical properties in this and in similar contexts. The petrophysical analysis reveals that the quartzolithic sandstones have the lowest porosity values, with a median of 4.56%. In contrast, porosity increases to median values of 16.75% in the quartzofeldspathic and arkosic petrofacies. The median permeability values range between 4.85 and 236.38 mD, and its distribution is generally poorly correlated with any other petrophysical parameter. The most widespread diagenetic minerals observed are carbonates, clay minerals, Fe-oxides and hydroxides, and less quartz. These sandstones are characterized by high compaction, which is the primary factor controlling porosity loss since the early diagenetic phases. In contrast, the early precipitation of pore-filling carbonate cement is assumed to have partly reduced the effect of compaction in quartzolithic and arkosic sandstones. Nonetheless, variations in petrophysical features among petrofacies can be traced back to the detrital composition, with the highest but less effective porosity associated with the presence of ductile grains, siliciclastic matrix and feldspars. Accordingly, this study reveals how linking detrital modes to the key petrophysical parameters may help obtain significant information about the regional control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in clastic turbiditic wedges of foreland domain settings as a baseline useful to further local and detailed studies.

Diagenesis and petrophysics of Miocene sandstones within southern Apennines foreland, Italy

Civitelli, M
;
Borrelli, M;Criniti, S;Falsetta, E
2023-01-01

Abstract

Deep-marine clastic turbidite beds commonly occur in the Southern Apennines and record the main tectonic phases associated with the structural evolution of the area. Based on variations of detrital compositions through time, the sandstone suites are traditionally subdivided into four petrofacies: (I) quartzolithic (Burdigalian-Langhian), (II) quartzofeldspatholithic (Langhian-Tortonian), (III) quartzofeldspathic (Serravallian-Tortonian), and (IV) arkose (Tortonian-Messinian) sandstones. Since the complexity and diversity of these sandstone petrofacies, we aim to investigate their major diagenetic events and relate them with their detrital modes and physical properties in order to obtain key basic information at a regional scale, to better understand the main controls on petrophysical properties in this and in similar contexts. The petrophysical analysis reveals that the quartzolithic sandstones have the lowest porosity values, with a median of 4.56%. In contrast, porosity increases to median values of 16.75% in the quartzofeldspathic and arkosic petrofacies. The median permeability values range between 4.85 and 236.38 mD, and its distribution is generally poorly correlated with any other petrophysical parameter. The most widespread diagenetic minerals observed are carbonates, clay minerals, Fe-oxides and hydroxides, and less quartz. These sandstones are characterized by high compaction, which is the primary factor controlling porosity loss since the early diagenetic phases. In contrast, the early precipitation of pore-filling carbonate cement is assumed to have partly reduced the effect of compaction in quartzolithic and arkosic sandstones. Nonetheless, variations in petrophysical features among petrofacies can be traced back to the detrital composition, with the highest but less effective porosity associated with the presence of ductile grains, siliciclastic matrix and feldspars. Accordingly, this study reveals how linking detrital modes to the key petrophysical parameters may help obtain significant information about the regional control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in clastic turbiditic wedges of foreland domain settings as a baseline useful to further local and detailed studies.
2023
Southern apennines
Foreland basin system
Petrofacies
Diagenesis
Compaction
Mercury injection porosimetry
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/360939
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