CLIL is revealing itself as far more than merely a means of combining language and content learning. In giving equal importance to both content and language learning (Marsh and Marsland, 1999), CLIL advocates a 50:50/Content:Language CLIL-equilibrium where the 50:Language component refers to the learners’ language. In doing so, CLIL automatically changes classroom dynamics: rather than downloading information onto passive learners, teachers guide learners towards deep-level understanding of concepts through interactive knowledge-construction processes. Such active learning processes are coherent with how the brain learns. This paper first presents a 50:50/Content:Language activity which enables the reader to acquire science-knowledge through language use. The efficacy of approaching science through CLIL is then explained by the fact that memory formation does not occur in isolation but is tightly linked to the neurobiological processes of fear, motivation and executive control. Finally, the activity is dissected into the operational components of sustained deep learning - an essential state underlying successful academic pursuits - concluding with a discussion of why such a CLIL-Science approach enables both language and content teachers to work within their comfort zones - an essential condition for mainstreaming CLIL. Ironically, science illiteracy is an ailment befalling those born into our scientifically advanced high-tech modern society since science education is failing to equip learners with a secure grasp of concepts underlying natural everyday phenomena. The 50:50/Content:Language CLIL-Science equilibrium provides a pragmatic solution to this problem, and if done well, will enable individuals to discern fact from fiction rather than drowning or unconditionally swallowing the inundation of information appearing with a click-of-the-mouse.

CLIL appeals to how the brain likes its information: examples from CLIL-(Neuro)Science. In Focus Article) / Ting, Yen-ling. - In: INTERNATIONAL CLIL RESEARCH JOURNAL. - ISSN 1797-948X. - (2010), pp. 1-18.

CLIL appeals to how the brain likes its information: examples from CLIL-(Neuro)Science. In Focus Article)

TING, Yen-ling
2010

Abstract

CLIL is revealing itself as far more than merely a means of combining language and content learning. In giving equal importance to both content and language learning (Marsh and Marsland, 1999), CLIL advocates a 50:50/Content:Language CLIL-equilibrium where the 50:Language component refers to the learners’ language. In doing so, CLIL automatically changes classroom dynamics: rather than downloading information onto passive learners, teachers guide learners towards deep-level understanding of concepts through interactive knowledge-construction processes. Such active learning processes are coherent with how the brain learns. This paper first presents a 50:50/Content:Language activity which enables the reader to acquire science-knowledge through language use. The efficacy of approaching science through CLIL is then explained by the fact that memory formation does not occur in isolation but is tightly linked to the neurobiological processes of fear, motivation and executive control. Finally, the activity is dissected into the operational components of sustained deep learning - an essential state underlying successful academic pursuits - concluding with a discussion of why such a CLIL-Science approach enables both language and content teachers to work within their comfort zones - an essential condition for mainstreaming CLIL. Ironically, science illiteracy is an ailment befalling those born into our scientifically advanced high-tech modern society since science education is failing to equip learners with a secure grasp of concepts underlying natural everyday phenomena. The 50:50/Content:Language CLIL-Science equilibrium provides a pragmatic solution to this problem, and if done well, will enable individuals to discern fact from fiction rather than drowning or unconditionally swallowing the inundation of information appearing with a click-of-the-mouse.
Science education ; Mainstreaming CLIL; CLIL-science-education
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/139714
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