Resistant starch (RS) is the starch fraction that eludes digestion in the small intestine. RS is classified into five subtypes (RS1–RS5), some of which occur naturally in plant-derived foods, whereas the others may be produced by several processing conditions. The different RS subtypes are widely found in processed foods, but their physiological effects depend on their structural characteristics. In the present study, foods, nutrition and biochemistry are summarized in order to assess the type and content of RS in foods belonging to the Mediterranean Diet (MeD). Then, the benefits of RS consumption on health are discussed, focusing on their capability to enhance glycemic control. RS enters the large bowel intestine, where it is fermented by the microbiome leading to the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids as major end products, which in turn have systemic health effects besides the in situ one. It is hoped that this review will help to understand the pros of RS consumption as an ingredient of MeD food. Consequently, new future research directions could be explored for developing advanced dietary strategies to prevent non-communicable diseases, including colon cancer.

Resistant starches and non-communicable disease: A focus on mediterranean diet

Cione E.;Fazio A.;Curcio R.;Tucci P.;Lauria G.;Cappello A. R.;Dolce V.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Resistant starch (RS) is the starch fraction that eludes digestion in the small intestine. RS is classified into five subtypes (RS1–RS5), some of which occur naturally in plant-derived foods, whereas the others may be produced by several processing conditions. The different RS subtypes are widely found in processed foods, but their physiological effects depend on their structural characteristics. In the present study, foods, nutrition and biochemistry are summarized in order to assess the type and content of RS in foods belonging to the Mediterranean Diet (MeD). Then, the benefits of RS consumption on health are discussed, focusing on their capability to enhance glycemic control. RS enters the large bowel intestine, where it is fermented by the microbiome leading to the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids as major end products, which in turn have systemic health effects besides the in situ one. It is hoped that this review will help to understand the pros of RS consumption as an ingredient of MeD food. Consequently, new future research directions could be explored for developing advanced dietary strategies to prevent non-communicable diseases, including colon cancer.
2021
Cancer
Glycemic control
Inflammation
Microbiome
Resistant starches
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11770/325387
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 20
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact